Review: The Day Human Prince by B. Kristin McMichael

The Day Human Prince Book Cover The Day Human Prince
B. Kristin McMichael

Devin Alexander grew up as the only day human in a world surrounded by night humans who drank blood, sometimes his blood. He spent his life training toward one goal: the protection of one of those blood drinkers, Arianna Grace. But what is he supposed to do when the blue-eyed girl of the legends doesn’t need him anymore? What does his life mean then? How is a guy supposed to move on when the girl he has yearned over for a decade has chosen someone else?

Before he can even start to figure out his new life without Arianna, Devin has to deal with another problem. He needs to take care of some unfinished business with a night human he has known for less than a month, but with whom he is magically bound.

Vanessa McKinny has promised that she knows a way to undo the spell she placed on Devin to save his life. Devin would do anything to break the bond to be free of her, even if it means traveling to the sidhe village, a place inhabited by a race of night humans that has not had a day human visitor in more than a hundred years. If he doesn’t want to get stuck, he must work with Nessa to find a way to break the bond. Only then can Devin have time to get back to finding his new goal in life, unless he discovers that his path lies with the sidhe.

Review:

A free copy of this book was provided by Xpresso Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.

Several years ago, my husband convinced me to watch X-men: The Last Stand. I protested that I hadn’t seen the first two X-men movies and wouldn’t understand if I started with the third one, but he assured me I’d be able to follow along. I conceded, and we proceeded to watch the film. About half an hour in I still had no idea who the characters were or why they were doing what they were doing, and I kept asking my husband what was happening. His answer, consistently, was: “Oh, if you’d seen the first two movies it would make more sense.”

Reading The Day Human Prince was a similar experience. When I started the book, I had no idea that it was a spin-off of McMichael’s Blue Eyes trilogy. I was disappointed by the one-dimensional characters and lack of strong world building. Once I discovered that the action had begun in a previous series, though, it made sense that everything wasn’t being explained in detail. The foundation had already been laid in Blue Eyes. I’d just missed it.

Everything that seemed remotely interesting in The Day Human Prince – Devin’s unrequited love for Arianna Grace, his tragic history, details about the night human culture – was apparently dealt with in the Blue Eyes books and only mentioned briefly in this spin-off. It was a letdown, and though the plot was decent I think I would have enjoyed it more if I’d read the preceding books.

Then again, maybe not, because I had a huge problem with this book that had nothing to do with the plot or characters: the writing is terrible.

There’s so much that bothers me about McMichael’s writing style that I don’t know where to start. The phrasing is awkward, the sentence structure is off, and there’s endless explanation about things that really don’t require it. What really got me, though, was the point of view.

As a general rule, I prefer first-person to third-person. There are several fantastic books that use third-person successfully (The Raven Boys, the Harry Potter books, most of the novels in The Queen’s Thief series), but there are also myriad novels that don’t. They distance the reader from the characters, rely heavily on telling rather than showing, and engage in head-hopping, which always drives me batty. There are several instances of each of these problems in The Day Human Prince. They’re hard to overlook, and I found myself becoming distracted from the plot because I was so bothered by the writing.

There are also a few other niggling tidbits, like insta-love and absurd superhuman abilities – Devin can snatch an invisible arrow out of the air on its way to a target, for example – that kept me from truly appreciating this book. All of the good stuff – like cool magic and sleeping sidhe kings waiting to be awakened– gets overwhelmed by the parts that are less than great.

I may not have given this book a very positive review, but I will say that there are people who will really love The Day Human Prince, especially those who read and enjoyed the Blue Eyes trilogy. Many of my complaints about this book – particularly the ones about the point of view – are based purely on personal preference, so don’t automatically let me dissuade you from reading it. Instead, I recommend going to Amazon and checking out a few sample pages. If you’re ok with McMichael’s writing style, this may be a better book for you than it was for me.

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