Review: Wolf by Alma Alexander

Wolf Book Cover Wolf
Alma Alexander

My name is Mal Marsh.

I was the oldest unTurned Were of my generation, waiting Turn after Turn for my own time... which never came. Until the day, driven by desperation and by the guilt I still carried concerning my sister Celia's tragic death, I decided it was time to stop waiting... and made a dangerous choice in the name of pride and fury.

Instead of remaining the Random Were that I was born... I enlisted the help of a friend, a creature beyond the strictly drawn boundaries of Were-kind, and chose to become a Lycan, a true wolf. I thought it would give me a chance to take my revenge on those I believed to be responsible for what had happened to my sister. Right until the moment I realized that things were much more complicated that I had ever believed possible... and that my choice might have far more repercussions than I had thought.

One thing was clear.

Everything I thought I knew about my family was wrong.

Review:

*Review may contain spoilers for Random, the first book in The Were Chronicles.*

Ten months. Ten. That’s how long I suffered in agony after finishing Random and its doozy of a cliffhanger ending. Ten slow, painful months to try to get over the shock, to daydream about the characters I was missing, and to speculate about what I could expect from the series’ next installment, Wolf.

Now that those ten (TEN!) months are finally over and the sequel has arrived, I can cheerfully report that Wolf is well worth the wait. It’s got everything I loved about Random – beautiful writing, fascinating characters, more information about the intriguing world of Were-kind – as well as an added bonus: it’s narrated by Mal, my favorite character from Random.

When I heard that Jazz Marsh’s moody, enigmatic older brother would be the point-of-view character in Wolf, I was giddy. In Random, Mal started out as a seemingly minor character, your stereotypical sullen, standoffish teenage boy. By the end, however, he surprised everyone – myself included – by Turning into a Werewolf and emerging as a major player in the Marsh family’s story as well as the story of Were-kind in general. My curiosity wasn’t just piqued, it was set aflame, and I couldn’t wait to see what lay in store for Mal in Wolf.

Wolf picks up the thread of Mal’s story and follows him to his new home among his fellow Werewolves, known as the Lycans. Whereas Random showed Were-kind interacting with non-shape-shifting humans in the world at large, Wolf is a microcosm, focusing solely on the inner workings of the Lycan community. The Lycan compound, with its strict hierarchies and jealously guarded secrets, is its own – exclusive – little world. The Werewolves have their own unique culture, prejudices, and standards, and woe to any who don’t abide by their rules.

In order for Mal to infiltrate their ranks and uncover the truth about Stay and its effects on Were like his sister, he must eschew his family, his upbringing, and everything he once knew. Becoming a member of the pack means forfeiting his choices and accepting all of the decisions the Alphas make for him. The pack chooses his college courses, his job, and even his mate. Yep, that’s right– even though he’s just 17, Mal is expected to marry a woman of the pack’s choosing and get to work producing little Lycan babies. Gotta start spreading that new, valuable DNA around, ya know?

I loved watching Mal come into his own over the course of this book, rolling with everything the Lycans throw at him, even the stuff wholly outside of his comfort zone. He grumbles, and struggles, and balks…and then he grits his teeth, puts his head down, and soldiers on, because it’s the only way for him to move forward. It was so rewarding to see this grouchy, self-pitying boy grow and mature and become someone I was so proud of.

Despite my fondness of Mal, or perhaps because of it, I was not a fan of Asia, the girl the Lycans choose to be Mal’s mate. Maybe it’s jealousy on my part, but Asia just seems too perfect: she’s gorgeous, wild, brilliantly intelligent, and always in control. I did initially enjoy the dynamic between her and Mal – their first interactions are fraught with understandable tension, what with both being strangers and being called to give up their dreams at the pack’s command. This tension soon gives way to affection, though, as the two quickly come to accept and even love one another. This transition from strangers to intimates happened too fast for me, and I would have liked the awkwardness and uncertainty to linger for a while longer, for the discovery of love to be gradual and even grudging.

My only other “complaint,” if you can call it that, is similar to one I had when reading Random. The diction and sentence structure, while lovely, don’t always match with the voices you’d expect the characters to have. Dialogue occasionally comes out sounding like philosophers engaging in a grand intellectual debate instead of two people carrying on a regular conversation, and even Mal’s internal monologues tend to read like dissertations at times. As I mentioned in my review of Random, though, Alma Alexander’s writing is so interesting and beautiful that it doesn’t really matter how lofty the tone is. For example, here’s a passage I found particularly insightful:

“My life was layered with these moments; if it could be dug into, like an archaeological site, there would be layers of ashes and waste left over from catastrophic volcanic disasters in between the fertile parts where something good or useful was happening.”

As Mal establishes himself within his new pack, he slowly begins to unravel the Lycans’ closely guarded secrets. The facts he discovers about Turning Houses and the Half-Souled make his skin crawl, and the more he uncovers – the closer he gets to finding out the truth about his sister – the greater the risk to himself and to his fledgling relationship with Asia. I enjoyed watching as the stakes were raised, plot twists popped up, and old friends and family from Random reappeared to lend Mal a helping hand.

If you enjoyed Random, I have no doubt you’ll be exceedingly pleased with Wolf. It’s a worthy progression of the series, and Mal is a protagonist you can root for, sympathize with, and even fall for. I’m so excited to see what’s next for Mal, his friends, and his family in The Were Chronicles’ final chapter and only hope the months fly by until book three is released!

A free ARC of this book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

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