Fictional Tricksters – An April Fools’ Day Book List

April Fools' Day Fictional Tricksters

I’ve long had a soft spot for scallywags and scamps in books, and what better time to celebrate them than on April Fools’ Day? If you’re looking for some ideas on how to pull off the ultimate scheme or prank, these fictional tricksters can point you in the right direction.

Book cover for This Can't Be Happening at MacDonald Hall by Gordon Korman1) Bruno and Boots from the MacDonald Hall series by Gordan Korman: Korman’s This Can’t Be Happening at MacDonald Hall is the book that first kindled my love for mischievous troublemakers. The protagonists, Boots and Bruno, are two boarding school boys who just can’t seem to stay out of trouble. They’re constantly wreaking havoc, like putting Alka-Seltzer in the swimming pool, stealing a rival school’s mascot, or letting a classmate’s ant farm loose in the halls. Fifth-grade me found the MacDonald Hall series delightfully hilarious and couldn’t get enough of Bruno and Boots’ hijinks.

Book cover for Bloody Jack by L. A. Meyer2) Jacky Faber from the Bloody Jack series by L.A. Meyer: Spunky, theatrical, and resilient, Jacky Faber is my fictional BFF. Her initial “trick” is to disguise herself as a boy in order to secure a spot upon a British warship, but as the series progresses Jacky becomes embroiled in myriad other schemes and capers. She’s a natural actress and has no problem playing the wretched waif, coy maiden, saucy minx, or fearsome pirate. She’s always up for an adventure, which usually leads to her getting herself in and out of hilarious scrapes.

Book cover for The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner3) Eugenides from the Queen’s Thief series by Megan Whalen Turner: Eugenides has the distinction of being the cleverest, most cunning character I’ve had the pleasure of reading about. He’s a master thief and brilliant strategist whose plans have the power to alter the fate of kingdoms. I’m completely in awe of Eugenides and count him as one of my top two favorite fictional characters of all time.

Book cover for How I Paid For College by Marc Acito4) Edward and friends from How I Paid For College: A Novel of Sex, Theft, Friendship and Musical Theater by Marc Acito: When Edward’s father cuts off his financial resources, right before Edward is supposed to start college, it seems like he’s hit a dead end. But Edward will do whatever it takes to come up with the money for Juilliard, and his ragtag group of friends will do whatever it takes to help him. Together they cook up a daring, hysterical, outrageous plot to scrape together Edward’s tuition, involving blackmail, money laundering, nun costumes, and a lot of other questionable behavior.

Book cover for The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch5) Locke Lamora from the Gentleman Bastard series by Scott Lynch: Locke and his band of professional con artists are crafty, shameless, and infinitely ballsy. There’s nothing they won’t do to pull off their impressively intricate schemes, which are jaw-dropping in their scope and execution.

Book cover for Dodger by Terry Pratchett6) Dodger from Dodger by Terry Pratchett: Inspired by The Artful Dodger from Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, Pratchett’s Dodger is a resourceful pickpocket living on the streets of 19th century London. He’s charismatic, scrappy, and mischievous, capable of producing tears on demand, charming passersby, and getting himself out of (and then back into) sticky situations and schemes.

Book cover for Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J. K. Rowling7) Fred and George from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling: No trickster list is complete without the Weasley twins! We could all do with some of their Weasley Wizard Wheezes, like the Extendable Ears to help eavesdrop on conversations, or Puking Pastilles to get out of tiresome obligations. To me, though, Fred and George’s most epic trick is their grand exit from Hogwarts, with its epic fireworks dragon and other chaos-causing charms.

Know any other tricksters who should be on this list? Let me know by leaving me a comment!

Review: Winger by Andrew Smith

Winger Book Cover Winger
Andrew Smith

Ryan Dean West is a fourteen-year-old junior at a boarding school for rich kids. He’s living in Opportunity Hall, the dorm for troublemakers, and rooming with the biggest bully on the rugby team. And he’s madly in love with his best friend Annie, who thinks of him as a little boy.

With the help of his sense of humor, rugby buddies, and his penchant for doodling comics, Ryan Dean manages to survive life’s complications and even find some happiness along the way. But when the unthinkable happens, he has to figure out how to hold on to what’s important, even when it feels like everything has fallen apart.

Review:

I need to stop letting books affect me like this. I’m going to wind up in the loony bin one of these days.

Winger threw me for a loop. My head is spinning, and I’m a little upset right now. As a result, please forgive me if this review isn’t completely logical or clear. To help you out, I’ll tell you up front what you need to know: you have to get your hands on this book. Right now.

Winger is one of those books that’s so special and fun that you feel privileged to have the chance to read it, and I enjoyed it so much that I started mentally writing my review before I was even finished with the novel. I had quotes ready to showcase just how gut-bustingly funny Smith’s writing is and how it made me laugh so hard I couldn’t breathe. I was prepared to mention phrases such as “catastrophic penis injury” and “‘I’m going to write you a sonnet about how nothing could possibly be gayer than writing your friend a haiku.’”

I was ready to gush and on about how happy this story made me, and how it is such a warm, feel-good tale with unforgettable characters, an entertaining plot, and enough clever pranks and stunts to keep me chuckling to myself for the next month. I was going to mention how the comics and diagrams that accompany the text really enhance the story and planned to rave about the loveable protagonist, the excellent portrayal of the rugby team’s camaraderie, and the million other things I loved about this book.

And then, out of nowhere – BAM! – the whole book did a complete 180. It felt like my previously fun, adorable puppy had just turned around and tried to rip my face off.

I can’t tell you what, exactly, happened to make me feel such a sense of shock and betrayal. That would be cheating, and it would ruin the book for you. Just know this: despite how much it messed me up, I still can’t recommend Winger enough. There is no doubt that this book is exceptional, and you’re doing yourself a disservice if you don’t take the time to read it.